• Opium War to Self-Strengthening Movement
    (1840-1894)
  • 1st Sino-Japanese War to 1911 Revolution
    (1894-1911)
  • Birth of the ROC to Nanking Decade
    (1912-1937)
  • Tales of Hong Kong & Macao (Coming Soon)
    (1840-1949)
  • 2nd Sino-Japanese War (Coming Soon)
    (1931-1945)
  • Civil War and Founding of the PRC (Coming Soon)
    (1945-1949)
Opium War to Self-Strengthening Movement
(1840-1894)
1st Sino-Japanese War to 1911 Revolution
(1894-1911)
Birth of the ROC to Nanking Decade
(1912-1937)
Tales of Hong Kong & Macao (Coming Soon)
(1840-1949)
2nd Sino-Japanese War (Coming Soon)
(1931-1945)
Civil War and Founding of the PRC (Coming Soon)
(1945-1949)

Opium War (1840-1842)

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The Opium War: an Overview

The Opium War that took place from 1840 to 1842 was a war between China and Britain over opium trade and other trade-related issues. It ended with China’s defeat and the signing of its first unequal treaty, and marked the beginning of China’s early modern age.

See More

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(1) The West vs. China

China’s defeat in the Opium War with Britain reflects a divergence of development during that period when Western countries strived towards an advancement which China rejected.

See More

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(2) British Trade Expansion

As Britain sought to profit from foreign trade multiple envoys were deployed to open the China market which, as a peasant economy, had no desire for trade.

See More

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(3) Mass Imports of Opium into China

British trade in the Far East was dependent on the illicit opium trade between British companies and China, where many thousands became addicted. This trade consumed huge sums of money, draining China’s coffers. The effective prohibition of opium became a national priority.

See More

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(4) Drug fighter Lin Zexu

In 1839, Imperial Commissioner Lin Zexu arrived in Guangzhou and immediately issued a ban on opium. In June of the same year, around 20,000 boxes of imported opium were seized and destroyed in Humen, attracting worldwide attention.

See More

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(5) A war between the ancient and advanced

After the opium destruction in Humen, Sino-British relations became increasingly tense and friction continued. In 1840, a war between industrialized Britain and ancient China eventually broke out, a face-off in which thousands of British troops confronting ten times and more Qing Army.

See More

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(6) The Treaty of Nanking and its Aftermath

The Treaty of Nanjing was signed to conclude the Opium War. It required China to compensate Britain by making war reparations and numerous concessions. Amongst these, the ceding of Hong Kong Island to Britain was most significant and had wide-ranging implications.

See More

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(7) Chinese intellectuals begin to explore the world

The Opium War gave rise to a national movement of reflection among Chinese intellectuals. Figures such as Lin Zexu, Wei Yuan, Xu Jiyu and others opened the world to the people of China through a compilation of global knowledge, while Chinese scholars including Gong Zizhen and Feng Guifen advocated the modernization of China.

See More

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See More

yapian1_thumbnail_238x238_v1

See More

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See More

yapian3_thumbnail_238x238_v1

See More

yapian4_thumbnail_238x238_v1

See More

yapian5_thumbnail_v1

See More

yapian6_thumbnail_238x238_v1

See More

yapian7_thumbnail_v1

See More

Read More

The Opium War: an Overview

The Opium War that took place from 1840 to 1842 was a war between China and Britain over opium trade and other trade-related issues. It ended with China’s defeat and the signing of its first unequal treaty, and marked the beginning of China’s early modern age.

The Opium War: an Overview

The Opium War that took place from 1840 to 1842 was a war between China and Britain over opium trade and other trade-related issues. It ended with China’s defeat and the signing of its first unequal treaty, and marked the beginning of China’s early modern age.

(1) The West vs. China

China’s defeat in the Opium War with Britain reflects a divergence of development during that period when Western countries strived towards an advancement which China rejected.

(2) British Trade Expansion

As Britain sought to profit from foreign trade multiple envoys were deployed to open the China market which, as a peasant economy, had no desire for trade.

(3) Mass Imports of Opium into China

British trade in the Far East was dependent on the illicit opium trade between British companies and China, where many thousands became addicted. This trade consumed huge sums of money, draining China’s coffers. The effective prohibition of opium became a national priority.

(4) Drug fighter Lin Zexu

In 1839, Imperial Commissioner Lin Zexu arrived in Guangzhou and immediately issued a ban on opium. In June of the same year, around 20,000 boxes of imported opium were seized and destroyed in Humen, attracting worldwide attention.

(5) A war between the ancient and advanced

After the opium destruction in Humen, Sino-British relations became increasingly tense and friction continued. In 1840, a war between industrialized Britain and ancient China eventually broke out, a face-off in which thousands of British troops confronting ten times and more Qing Army.

(6) The Treaty of Nanking and its Aftermath

The Treaty of Nanjing was signed to conclude the Opium War. It required China to compensate Britain by making war reparations and numerous concessions. Amongst these, the ceding of Hong Kong Island to Britain was most significant and had wide-ranging implications.

(7) Chinese intellectuals begin to explore the world

The Opium War gave rise to a national movement of reflection among Chinese intellectuals. Figures such as Lin Zexu, Wei Yuan, Xu Jiyu and others opened the world to the people of China through a compilation of global knowledge, while Chinese scholars including Gong Zizhen and Feng Guifen advocated the modernization of China.